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NURTURING EXPLAINED

It is only now that we can explain the human condition it becomes safe to finally admit that nurturing is what made us human — that it was nurturing that gave us our moral soul and created humanity.

Line drawing of happy innocent children by Jeremy Griffith
Photo of happy innocent children smiling and laughing

Almost every edition of every science journal over the last 10 years has either presented or discussed a new theory that attempts to account for our moral sense. But of all these theories only one provides the fully accountable and thus adequate, true explanation for the origins of our moral sense, which is that it was achieved through nurturing — a mother’s maternal instinct to care for her offspring.

However, the problem with this nurturing explanation, and why its early permutations were discarded by the scientific establishment, is that it has been an unbearably confronting truth. It is only now that we can explain the human condition and thus understand why the present human-condition-afflicted human race hasn’t been able to adequately nurture our infants to the extent their instincts expect that it becomes safe to finally admit that nurturing is what made us human — that it was nurturing that gave us our moral soul and created humanity. So how did nurturing create our extraordinary unconditionally selfless moral instincts?

You can read about the explanation in Chapter 5 of FREEDOM.

“I am a mother of three children. Hendrik and I raised our children according to Jean Liedloff’s book ‘The Continuum Concept’ where there is a continuum from being in the womb and going out into life. It is something that little children expect. In Western societies you see there are all these children literally screaming for attention. If you want to have a whole human being you have to really nurture a person from day zero. Liedloff's wasn't able to explain why children need so much nurturing, but Jeremy Griffith's work does explain why it's so important. Its in our genes to expect to be treated lovingly from when we are born.

The importance of nurturing was, for me, the basis for understanding the insights of Jeremy Griffith. I see Jeremy as the next and final step on the journey to true wholeness for humanity, this time also truly healing for adults.”

Annemieke Akker, Co-founder of the WTM Netherlands Centre

Line drawing by Jeremy Griffith of Don Quixote on a horse charging a windmill with descriptive text - The Human Spirit

“While it has been unbearable and thus unconfrontable, the truth, nevertheless, is that nurturing was the all-important influence in the maturation of our species and remains the all-important influence in the maturation of our individual lives. The female gender created humanity, and, while under the duress of the upset state of the human condition it has rarely been possible to adequately nurture our offspring, the importance of nurturing in producing a secure, sound adult remains paramount.”

Paragraph 420 of Chapter 5 in FREEDOM.